Berrypicker Trek

Berrypicker Trek is a tough 12.7-kilometer out-and-back trail near Vail, Colorado, that boasts magnificent wildflowers. The route is open year-round and offers a variety of activities. This trail is also suitable for dogs.
This trail passes through the Eagles Nest Wilderness, subject to strict laws designed to conserve natural resources. Dogs must always be on a hand-held leash, according to the rules. Camping is not permitted within 100 feet of any lake, stream, or trail. Campfires are prohibited above 11,000 feet, within 100 feet of any stream or route, within 1/4 mile of any lake, and during local fire bans. Overnight users are required to obtain a valid self-registration form, which can be acquired at most trailheads. Please practice Leave No Trace principles. For further information, visit the Forest Service’s Eagles Nest Wilderness Restrictions page.

If you complete this hike while the gondola is functioning, you can take the gondola to skip the uphill or downhill portions of the hike. However, the hike is also a pleasant out-and-back.

Pitkin Lake Trail

Pitkin Lake Trail is a 16.9-kilometer out-and-back trail with a lake that is classed as challenging and is located near Vail, Colorado. The trail is best used from June to October and is generally used for hiking. This trail is also open to dogs, although they must be kept on a leash.


This trail passes through the Eagles Nest Wilderness, subject to strict laws designed to conserve natural resources. Dogs must always be on a hand-held leash, according to the rules. Camping is not permitted within 100 feet of any lake, stream, or trail. Campfires are prohibited above 11,000 feet, within 100 feet of any stream or route, within 1/4 mile of any lake, and during local fire bans. Overnight users are required to obtain a valid self-registration form, which can be acquired at most trailheads. Please practice Leave No Trace principles. For further information, go to the Forest Service’s Eagles Nest Wilderness Restrictions page.

This trail reaches the Eagles Nest Wilderness. There are wilderness laws in place, which are displayed at the trailhead.

The Pitkin trailhead does not allow overnight parking. Backpackers can park for free and ride the bus to the Pitkin trailhead from the Gore Creek or Red Sandstone parking garages. Alternatively, you can pay $35 to park in the Vail parking structure overnight and take the free bus to the trailhead.

Lost Lake Trail

The Lost Lake Walk is an 11.3-kilometer out-and-back trail with a lake near Vail, Colorado that is suitable for hikers of all abilities. The route is best used from May to October and offers a variety of activities. This trail is also open to dogs, although they must be kept on a leash.

Gore Valley Trail

Gore Valley Trail: Bighorn to Eagle River is a 31.1-kilometer moderately trafficked out-and-back trail with a river in Vail, Colorado. The trail is best used from May to October and is generally used for walking, running, and road riding. This trail is also open to dogs, although they must be kept on a leash.

Beautiful paved path with great mountain, aspen tree, and stream views that is popular for strolling and bicycling. The trail is 12 miles long, stretching from the East Valley Trail on the west to the Val Pass Trail on the east.

Accessibility: At the trail’s east end, there is one designated accessible place in a tiny paved parking area off Bighorn Road. It has a striped access aisle that is suitable for vans. The trail is smooth and paved (with partial handrails). It’s usually 3 to 6 feet broad, with plenty of bigger passageways. The trail’s width is reduced by a painted dividing line and metal bollards along with the majority of it. A bike lane on the side of the road marked with a painted line is used for part of the trail.

When traveling west, the trail is mainly in the mild grade category (5 percent or less), but there are steeper sections at roughly 1.3 – 1.5, 2.8, and 5.1 – 5.8 kilometers. Trail users in wheelchairs, mobility equipment, or strollers may require help or avoid the steeper areas for safety reasons. Along the walk, there are seats and picnic tables for relaxing. Along the trail, there are wheelchair-accessible restrooms.

Falls via Upper Piney River Trail

Falls via Upper Piney River Trail is a moderately used 8.9-kilometer out-and-back trail near Vail, Colorado, that features a lake. The trail is best used from May to October and is generally used for hiking. This trail is also open to dogs, although they must be kept on a leash.

This trail passes through the Eagles Nest Wilderness, subject to strict laws designed to conserve natural resources. Dogs must always be on a hand-held leash, according to the rules. Camping is not permitted within 100 feet of any lake, stream, or trail. Campfires are prohibited above 11,000 feet, within 100 feet of any stream or route, within 1/4 mile of any lake, and during local fire bans. Overnight users are required to obtain a valid self-registration form, which can be acquired at most trailheads. Please practice Leave No Trace principles. For further information, go to the Forest Service’s Eagles Nest Wilderness Restrictions page.

Seasonal road closure: The roads leading to this trailhead are closed for the season except for snowmobiles. Even in mild weather, 4×4 or high clearance cars may require the rugged 10-mile gravel route.

After parking outside of the Piney Trails Ranch, you will need to cross through a bit of length of private property to get to the trailhead. However, the public is allowed to pass through.

The Red Buffalo Pass via Gore Creek Trail

The Red Buffalo Pass via Gore Creek Trail, a 20.6-kilometer out-and-back trail with a waterfall near Vail, Colorado, is strenuous and features a waterfall. The trail is best used from April through October for hiking, bird observation, and horseback riding. This trail is also open to dogs, although they must be kept on a leash.
This trail passes through the Eagles Nest Wilderness, subject to strict laws designed to conserve natural resources. Dogs must always be on a hand-held leash, according to the rules. Camping is not permitted within 100 feet of any lake, stream, or trail. Campfires are prohibited above 11,000 feet, within 100 feet of any stream or route, within 1/4 mile of any lake, and during local fire bans. Overnight users are required to obtain a valid self-registration form, which can be acquired at most trailheads. Please practice Leave No Trace principles. For further information, visit the Forest Service’s Eagles Nest Wilderness Restrictions page.

This trail reaches the Eagles Nest Wilderness. There are wilderness laws in place, which are displayed at the trailhead.